From Quince It Came, and How It Went

From Quince It Came, and How It Went

Quince: Autumn’s Brightest (and often, most forgotten) Jewel

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Culinary quince, Cydonia oblonga, as delicious to the palate as to the eye. (Variety shown: Aromatnaya)

When we last left our spring quince tree, she was blushing with buds and fruitful possibilities. It seemed Mother Nature had a different plan, one that was rich in rain and parsimonious with the pollinators. 

Petals lined in pink are a fond reminder of from Quince it came.

 And so months later under the full moon of October, the harvest of the quince can be held in two cupped hands.

And so under the full moon of October, the fruit of the quince is sparse and destined for a few jars of jam, but no less beautiful hanging from the branches.

 

Boz prefers the crispy sweet crunch of a Jonagold apple to the dry raw state of an uncooked quince (but it will do in a pinch)

For the record, Boz prefers the crispy sweet crunch of a Jonagold apple to the dry raw state of an uncooked quince (but it will do in a pinch). Quince is best eatened cooked and usually reserved for jams, jellies, baking and compotes. It’s a fruit that’s better placed in a sauce pan than a snack hand.

My blog pal Sylvie at Laughing Duck Farms shares my love of quince and offers up some great ideas on What to Do With Quinces.

Related links:  My Quince Tree in Spring,  The Quince’s Delicious HistoryCornell:Growing QuinceDavid Lebovitz: Recipe Quince Tart Tartin, Simply Recipes: Membrillo (quince paste) Recipe.

What I was blogging about a year ago: Violetta Fig Finishes Out the Season (and unfortunately this year, not one fig off the tree).



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