Violette du Bordeaux Fig or Negronne: Two Names, Same Great Fig{41}

Violette du Bordeaux Fig

Negronne Fig or Violette du Bordeaux Fig

I have not quite exhausted my fig fest of love and wish to offer up one more in the August lineup: Violette du Bordeaux fig (or Negronne as it’s often called).  I just picked this fig today, three days later than I picked it last year. (How’s that for consistent ripening.) If you’re thinking about growing one in cool coastal climate like the Pacific Northwest, you will likely be well-rewarded. Though only a three-year-old tree, mine has produced figs the last two years on a robust, problem-free tree.

Negronne Fig or Violette du Bordeaux Fig on leaf

Covering a succulent and sweet flesh, the fig’s skin is so richly dark that in some light it looks black and in others a dreamy dark violet. If I only had two fig trees to plant, I would to plant a Peter’s Honey and Violette du Bordeaux (Negronne). No matter what moniker is used, I call them all delicious.

My young Negronne Fig Tree is branching out nicely; more branches, more figs.

My young Negronne Fig Tree is branching out nicely; more branches, more figs.

Dave Wilson Nursery describes Violette du Bordeaux as the following:

Small to medium size purple-black fruit with a very deep red strawberry pulp and distinctive, sweet, rich flavor. Brebas are pear-shaped with a thick, tapering neck, main crop figs are variable, often without neck. Medium eye. Excellent fresh or dried. Good for container culture or small spaces. Hardy. Self-Fruitful.

What I was blogging about a year ago (not surprisingly): Spotlight on Summer’s First Fig